multiple intelligence theory in education

One of the most popular ideas in education is applied in ways that its creator never intended.

multiple intelligence theory in education

Multiple intelligence theory in education
One of the most popular ideas in education is applied in ways that its creator never intended.
It’s clear that children learn differently—teachers in Edutopia’s audience are adamant on that score—but research shows that when students process and retain information, there is no dominant biological style, and that when teachers try to match instruction to a perceived learning style, the benefits are nonexistent.

Multiple intelligence theory in education
Words, language, and writing
People who are strong in visual-spatial intelligence are good at visualizing things. These individuals are often good with directions as well as maps, charts, videos, and pictures.  

Multiple intelligence theory in education
Proposed by Howard Gardner in 1983, the theory of multiple intelligences has revolutionized how we understand intelligence. Learn more about the research behind his theory.
Many educators have had the experience of not being able to reach some students until presenting the information in a completely different way or providing new options for student expression. Perhaps it was a student who struggled with writing until the teacher provided the option to create a graphic story, which blossomed into a beautiful and complex narrative. Or maybe it was a student who just couldn’t seem to grasp fractions, until he created them by separating oranges into slices.

Multiple intelligence theory in education
Howard Gardner of Harvard University originally identified seven distinct intelligences. According to Gardner, this theory, which emerged from cognitive research, “documents the extent to which students possess different kinds of minds and therefore learn, remember, perform, and understand in different ways.”
The theory of multiple intelligences is so intriguing because it expands our horizon of available teaching and learning tools beyond the conventional linguistic and logical methods used in most schools (e.g. lecture, textbooks, writing assignments, formulas, etc.).

Multiple intelligence theory in education
Linguistic Intelligence is a part of Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligence theory that deals with sensitivity to the spoken and written language, ability to learn languages, and capacity to use language to accomplish certain goals.
Some responses to this criticism include that the Multiple Intelligences theory doesn’t dispute the existence of the “g” factor; it proposes that it is equal along with the other intelligences. Many critics overlook the inclusion criteria set forth by Gardner.

Resources:

http://www.verywellmind.com/gardners-theory-of-multiple-intelligences-2795161
http://www.edutopia.org/multiple-intelligences-research
http://www.cornerstone.edu/blogs/lifelong-learning-matters/post/what-are-multiple-intelligences-and-how-do-they-affect-learning
http://www.simplypsychology.org/multiple-intelligences.html
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1949-8594.2001.tb17876.x