music education theory

Chapter 4: Approaches to Music Education Chapter Summary: The goal of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the most well-known music teaching methods used in music education. They are

music education theory

Schulwerk is rooted in arts and subject integration. In the early 20th century, Carl Orff met gymnastics and dance educator Dorothée Gunther and established an innovative school for children based on the idea that all human beings are musical by nature. Their approach was to combine movement (gymnastics), music, and dance. Orff developed the concept of elemental music based on the synthesis of the arts of the Greek Muses, which combined tone, dance, poetry, image, design, and theatrical gesture. Gunther and Orff’s approach was to create a comfortable environment that approximates the child’s natural world of play, thus allowing children to be introduced to a range of musical skills in a relaxed and stress-free setting.
Carl Orff’s definition of elemental music is based on small-scale musical patterns (e.g., ostinato, drone) familiar to the students.

Music education theory
Considering everything discussed so far and the earlier findings of other authors (Bamberger, 1979; Bernabé-Valero et al., 2016), it seems that both formal and untaught dimensions play a decisive role in musical progress. This study empirically tested two motivational models, incorporating classical variables from the musical field and a novel variable originating in positive psychology. We believe that this work shows the necessity to further integrate positive existential aspects into music education research, such as flourishing (Croom, 2012), resilience (Glowinski et al., 2016), and social bonds (Freeman, 2000). As Van Der Schyff (2015) states, people may engage more deeply with musicality when they view it as a means to form richer and more compassionate relationships with their peers, communities, and the “natural” and cultural worlds they inhabit.
Secondly, we chose those variables most closely related to the theoretical models to be empirically tested. The sample was selected from two universities where the authors are based. The battery of questions was self-administered under the authors’ supervision during one of the classes, with permission from both the university and the presiding teacher.

Music education theory
Each day, we were assigned to compose a melody in a particular mode (major, harmonic minor, dorian, phrygian, etc.). The following day, we shared our melodies with the group.
I recently came across this video by musician Victor Wooten on YouTube and thought to myself: the ideas expressed here fit very well with MLT (Music Learning Theory)!

Music education theory
Lake Forest College music education students work with students from Chicago’s Sullivan High School in an experiential learning program.
The College’s award-winning education program is one of the best in Illinois, with a high post-graduation employability rate: last year, 95% of Lake Forest education grads got jobs in educational settings.

Music education theory
When I first heard about Music Learning Theory and the work of Dr Edwin Gordon, a whole lot of puzzle pieces I had about music reading suddenly fitted into place.
MLT could just be the thing that has a massive impact on your students’ abilities to learn to read, play and enjoy music in the most holistic, relevant and connected way possible.

Resources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6689978/
http://colorinmypiano.com/category/music-learning-theory/
http://www.lakeforest.edu/academics/programs/musiced/
http://topmusic.co/music-learning-theory/
http://www.verywellmind.com/social-learning-theory-2795074